Small Stuff
buckybarnesing:

you ever see a thing that just makes you cackle? x

buckybarnesing:

you ever see a thing that just makes you cackle? x

loriendesse:

Smaug appreciation

Men who are progressive, profeminist, or allies to women — we have to constantly check ourselves. We have to be open and listen to women and sometimes respond by taking a backseat and not encroaching on female space in ways that are kind of natural to us. It’s so integrated into who we are as men: to take center stage, to lead, to be out front, to not really understand the power dynamic that’s at play. I think it’s really important for all of us men who are progressive and who are working to eradicate sexism and all the other social ills out there to be a lot more cognizant of our presence in these circles and spaces.
Byron Hurt in an interview with Bitch Magazine being an actual ally (via rozzingit)
leading-blind-bats:

thedarklordsay10:

priestlyandtish:

drunkenspeecheson-sobriety:

reblogging again because it’s absolutely incredible

important as fuck

can i put this on my refrigerator

I’m tapping this inside my locker and my room and looking at it everyday, this needs to be seen.

leading-blind-bats:

thedarklordsay10:

priestlyandtish:

drunkenspeecheson-sobriety:

reblogging again because it’s absolutely incredible

important as fuck

can i put this on my refrigerator

I’m tapping this inside my locker and my room and looking at it everyday, this needs to be seen.

I was broken. I tried to fix myself. I tried for you and for Tom and for Jill, but I think I’m supposed to stay broken. Maybe we all are.

themarysue:

I (Rebecca) vastly improved the 50 Shades of Grey trailer by taking screencaps and Photoshopping judgmental cartoon characters into them. YOU’RE WELCOME. See the rest here.

I detest the masculine point of view. I am bored by his heroism, virtue, and honour. I think the best these men can do is not talk about themselves anymore.

Virginia Woolf (via nobunnyluvsyou)

I’m going to hang this over my desk at work. SO THEY KNOW.

(via dismissivejerkoffmotion)

The fervor surrounding trigger warnings … makes it seem like it’s not possible to survive a triggering experience intact. It treats us like we must be protected or we’ll be further traumatized, like we’re broken and we can’t be dropped again and hope to be glued back together. But that’s a wrong way of thinking about trauma: Trauma doesn’t break people. It changes us, and it changes the way we have to operate, and sometimes we feel broken because we can’t go back to the way things were before the trauma occurred, but it essentially boils down to having to cultivate a new self-awareness and new habits. That isn’t so bad. The way to help a traumatized person isn’t to try to pad them from reality, it’s to be patient, understanding, consistent and predictable.
Rebecca Vipond Brink, “On Trigger Warnings And Facing Trauma,” TheFrisky.com (via thefrisky)

I agree with everything said. That’s the general idea of Trigger Warnings: They make things a little more predictable. A trigger warning is not meant to make posts inaccessible for people who experienced trauma. It’s not meant to stop discussion of triggering things. It’s meant to give people who are triggered by certain things to take a deep breath and steel themselves before diving into a discussion, etc. Or to decide that at this point in time, they are not up for that particular thing.
Should it be overdone? No. Should it make people feel like they are broken and need training wheels for the world? Hell no. But trauma means that there is a special vulnerability - and every person is vulnerable, trauma or no - that needs to be acknowledged.